Dec 142015
 

From the opinion page of the Wall Street Journal: http://www.wsj.com/articles/scalia-was-right-about-race-preferences-1450046813.

Whatever you think of IQ tests and their surrogates, they do measure the knowledge component that can contribute to success.  (They do not so much measure the effects of environment and motivation, but these three parts of successful achievement are intertwined.)  And the differences between the median results of Americans of European, African, and Far Eastern ancestry are well established.  In particular, the African median is one standard deviation below the European, which is below the Far Eastern.  It is not racist to repeat this finding or to use it when devising social policy.

We may usefully work to determine why these differences exist and to make them disappear.  But it is simply irresponsible to play like they don’t exist here and now.  As the article points out, the national policy of race preference in college admissions does indeed irresponsibly assume this, with long-lasting damage to the socioeconomic standing of the African component of the American population.  The problem extends to other policies.

It is worse than useless, it it extremely damaging to assume that all people are blank slates with equal potentials.  There is a normal distribution, a bell curve, in all things human.